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Disconnected: a first-hand look at Sprint’s customer abuse (updated) | Ars Technica

Posted by kristobaldude on June 13, 2012

Disconnected: a first-hand look at Sprint’s customer abuse (updated)

Sprint sucks

Sprint sucks

Surely no one needs to call Sprint customer service 90 times in six months? …

by  – July 13 2007, 8:45am PDT

Sprint got into hot water last week when word began to trickle up the media food chain that the company is booting customers who roam too much (including soldiers stationed in no-service zones) or who call customer service too many times. If you caught the media coverage of this story in everything from the Wall Street Journal to a segment last night on CNN, then you probably noticed a common theme in the online responses and “man on the street” interviews—indeed, you may have had this reaction yourself: booting American soldiers at West Point for excessive use of the “free roaming” service is a big no-no, but anyone who calls customer service 90 times in six months deserves to have their account canceled.

If your reaction to the news of Sprint booting people for excessive customer service calls was, “Good for Sprint… people are whiners,” then I’d urge you to rethink that attitude.

ZDNET blogger Russell Shaw, who has been following this controversy in a series of posts, reportsthe following experience of a Sprint customer named Rene:

“The vast majority of my calls were to fix errors Sprint made,” Rene tells me in her latest email. “Most of the calls were transferred numerous times, disconnected (forcing me to call back) or they told me to call a different #. “That’s why the actual “call #” was so high.”

I can personally vouch that Rene’s account isn’t at all far-fetched. As a long-time Sprint customer who has had major problems trying to recoup massive overcharges from a generally incompetent and unresponsive Sprint customer service department, I can tell you from first-hand experience: if Sprint owes you $300 or more (like they did me), then you’d better be prepared to dial customer service again and again and again if you want your money back.

I was promised follow-up calls, refunds, and all sorts of other things that never materialized. And every time I made a call to customer service, I had to bring a new agent up to speed on my apparently baffling and peculiar case history. (The language barrier between me and the typical Sprint rep didn’t help, either.) Over the course of about a month, I got disconnected, transferred, and generally jerked around until finally, at long last, a sympathetic … (Read more here)

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One Response to “Disconnected: a first-hand look at Sprint’s customer abuse (updated) | Ars Technica”

  1. kristobaldude said

    Reblogged this on CodeSlayer2010 : Slaying Code 24/7! and commented:

    This is an older article, but I’ve been having some trouble with Sprint lately and wanted to reblog this because it is a good precursor to post I’m probably going to write soon if things don’t change.

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